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This short video on saving Pacific herring (i.e., restoring and demonstrating against DFO's mismanagement) aired on The National last night. ... See MoreSee Less
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Great graphic...Herring are worth more in the water than in nets. Herring are most valuable to British Columbia as the foundation of the coastal ecosystem and herring contribute more to British Columbia’s economy by feeding other species than by being caught and processed. Better management of herring populations is an investment in the B.C. economy. Many of the fish species that eat herring sustain coastal economies through enabling commercial and sport fisheries. In 2016, the B.C. sport fishing industry employed 9,000 people and generated approximately $1.1 billion in gross revenue. Further, the whale populations that rely on herring, like humpbacks and orcas, draw hundreds of thousands of tourists to B.C. Marine-based recreation contributes over $4.3 billion to B.C.’s economy annually (2014). Meanwhile, the herring fishery generated approximately $19 million in 2019.Revenue generated by B.C.’s commercial salmon fishery decreased by more than $44 million from 2016 to 2019. This indicates that salmon populations are not what they once were, either. By protecting herring—Chinook salmon’s primary food source—we are also supporting salmon populations.Photo by Kali WexlerSources: ~ Fisheries and Oceans Canada~ BC Ministry of Agriculture~ David Suzuki Foundation ... See MoreSee Less
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A nice posting by Dennis Forsyth for DCA. ... See MoreSee Less
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Awesome photos from yesterday. ... See MoreSee Less
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Apparently there are some orcas hunting around the south end of Denman on the Baynes Sound side. ... See MoreSee Less
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Kelp forests change over time. Ocean conditions, predation pressures, large storms—these can all affect how much kelp we see from year to year. Tracking this change is key to understanding how kelp is doing across the massive BC coastline, and satellites are a key tool scientists use to track trends.Landsat satellites have been taking pictures of the BC coast every 16 days since 1984, and capturing a lot of potential photos of kelp forests in the process. But even when cloudy days (the nemesis of coastal mapping) are filtered out, 35+ years of data is still too much to handle.That’s where the Google Earth Engine Kelp (GEEK) Tool comes in. It helps narrow this huge amount of data down to the most useful photos. To see it in action, check out the GEEK Tool ArcGIS StoryMap created by Hakai geospatial scientists Luba Reshitnyk and Will McInnes: storymaps.arcgis.com/stories/f29e19c6b23a4227a5eca87edb61ea97The scientists who developed this newly-launched tool are looking for feedback to make it even better, and you can help! Local historical knowledge helps refine the GEEK tool’s algorithm. So where are the BIGGEST kelp forests—either giant or bull kelp—you’ve seen in British Columbia? When did you see them? Send your comments to data@hakai.org.📷 : Markus Thompson ... See MoreSee Less
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